Are You Sure You Don't Need On-Air Rescue Practice?

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Reported by Dennis O’Connell, Director of Training

After more than 25 years in the rescue industry, I always cringe a bit when I hear rescue teams say they don’t practice “on-air” rescues because personnel at their facilities are not allowed to do planned work activities in IDLH or low O2 areas. But I always ask, what about the permit spaces that may have the “potential” for atmospheric hazards? What about those spaces that may unexpectedly become IDLH or low O2 – what then?  

"I have raised this flag many times before and according to NIOSH, a little less than half the deaths from atmospheric conditions occurred in spaces that originally tested as being acceptable for entry. Something happened unexpectedly, and something went very wrong."  READ MORE

Roco QUICK DRILL #4 - Selecting the Proper Knot and Tying Correctly

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Being able to tie a knot in the classroom with a rope short vs. selecting the proper knot and tying it correctly in the field during an emergency requires experience. With a little imagination, you can provide your team members numerous scenarios to practice in just a short period of time while they are still within a controlled environment. This practice will help them to gain more experience that should pay off in the long run if needed during a real life emergency.

1.  Identify the knots your team uses, and where they are used in various systems.

2.  Lay out a series of applications where team members would need to tie a knot. Decide in advance what knots are acceptable in these applications since many times more than one knot may get the job done.   READ MORE

OSHA Emergency Response Meeting in Washington, DC

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Reported by Jim Breen, Roco Rescue Director of Operations

On July 30 and 31, OSHA held an Emergency Response and Preparedness Stakeholders meeting in Washington, DC for the purpose of discussing the merits and potential content of an emergency response and preparedness standard.

Meeting participants were from a broad range of both public and private industry experts to include two Roco representatives, Jim Breen, Director of Operations, and Dennis O’Connell, Director of Training. Also participating were representatives from NFPA, IAFF, IAFC, USFA, Louisiana Fire Chiefs Association, Phillips 66, BASF Corporation, Chevron Pipeline Company, Chicago Fire Department, and the American Red Cross to name a few.  READ MORE

A Job Hazard Analysis for Work at Height

Thursday, July 31, 2014

The following article was featured in the June 2014 issue of ISHN, and authored by Roco Chief Instructor Pat Furr.

As part of my safety consulting duties, I have seen many fall protection programs for a wide variety of industries. When I ask about an employer’s fall protection plan, it’s pretty scary to be told, “Well, I can show you our program in two minutes”— and then see no more than a locker with a rag-tag assortment of body belts, harnesses and a few six- foot energy-absorbing lanyards of questionable integrity.

Now, it is rare to come across such an inadequate program. But truth be told, the comprehensiveness, diligence and effectiveness of the programs I have assessed run a fairly wide spectrum from so-so to top notch.   READ MORE

Rescue Toolbox: Stokes Basket Lashing for Rope Rescue

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Here's a new lashing technique for the Stokes basket used in rope rescue training.

  READ MORE

Confined Space Attendants Play a Crucial Role

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

The following article was featured in the July 2014 issue of ISHN, and authored by Roco's own Chief Instructor Pat Furr.

Have you ever wondered who that person is who hovers around the portal of a permit space while workers are in the space? What does a Confined Space Attendant (often referred to as the “Hole Watch”) do anyway? What may seem like a cushy job is actually a critical safety responsibility. Here’s why:

First, OSHA instituted regulations regarding Permit-Required Confined Spaces (1910.146) due to the high number of serious injuries and deaths in confined spaces. Entering these spaces is dangerous business, and the attendant serves as the “safety watchman” for entrants as well as those who may casually try to enter. This also applies in an emergency situation when others may be tempted (but unqualified) to enter the space to rescue a co-worker.   READ MORE

Quick-Connect Harness Buckle Safety

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Recently, we noticed a story in a leading safety and health magazine that questions the “two-piece, pass-through buckle” that is commonly used on many harnesses. The author, in fact, referred to it as a design flaw. However, we consider it more a matter of improper use than a design flaw. While he does identify some potential user failures, we feel his terming is not quite accurate. Here’s why...

As with any life support equipment, it is imperative to use the equipment in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions for use and receive the appropriate training as required. The author cites instances where he has observed the mating plate of the two-piece, pass-through buckle being improperly oriented which can lead to the buckle loosening and potentially disconnecting. He also suggests that the pass-through plate have some type of “visual indicator” to warn the user when the buckle is improperly connected. Of course, we’re always in favor of additional safety features!  READ MORE

Rescue Toolbox: The New "No-Step" Work-Rescue Harness from Roco & CMC

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

  READ MORE

OSHA Seeks Input on Emergency Response Standard

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Prompted by the 2013 fire and explosion that killed 12 firefighters at a Texas fertilizer facility, as well as other recent incidents, OSHA is considering the development of a standard on emergency response and preparedness.

Stakeholders are invited to provide input at an informal OSHA meeting in Washington on July 30 and, if needed, on July 31. Attendees must register by July 2.

OSHA first sought public input on an emergency response and preparedness rulemaking in 2007, when the agency issued a Request for Information. In that request, OSHA noted that although several of its current standards address certain issues emergency responders face (including blood borne pathogens and confined spaces), some of those standards are decades old.  READ MORE

Roco QUICK DRILL #3 - Knot Tying Challenge

Monday, June 09, 2014


A question that we often hear is, “How proficient should rescuers be with knot tying?” We recommend that rescuers be able to tie any of the knots used by their team without hesitation, or without even having to look at the knot as they are tying it.

As part of the skills requirement in our Roco certification courses, we require students to tie each knot (with safeties, as required) within 30 seconds. This gives us a good idea of the student’s proficiency in the basics of knot tying.

Here's a knot drill that we recommend:    READ MORE


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