Who is your Fall Protection MVP?

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

The following article was featured in the September issue of ISHN, and authored by RocoChief Instructor Pat Furr.
Every team has their most valuable player or person, their MVP. When you consider all the personnel who make up the fall protection team at your facility, who is your MVP?

Chances are it is your Competent Person. OSHA defines a Competent Person as “One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.” In order to do their job and become your Fall Protection MVP, it is very important that your Competent Person be.....well, competent.  READ MORE

Roco QUICK DRILL #5 - Building Complete Rescue Systems

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Due to time restraints in refresher training, oftentimes individual team members may only get to build a portion of a rescue system – for example, setting up a mainline or performing patient packaging. In order to have maximum team efficiency, it is important to keep all team members proficient in all aspects of the rescue operation.

1. Lay out enough equipment to build a mainline and a safety line system and for a particular type of packaging. Describe which system is to be used and how the patient will be packaged (i.e. vertical stokes raise, or horizontal SKED lower with attendant).
  READ MORE

Roco Rescue Challenge 2014 Video

Friday, October 10, 2014

Rescue Challenge 2014 - Huge Success!

Friday, October 10, 2014

Congrats to the 7 excellent teams who participated in 2014 Roco Rescue Challenge this week. There was plenty of learning, and lots of doing, and these guys and gals represent some of the finest industrial rescuers in America.

Thanks to all who made this year's event a success, and to the hard working emergency responders who dedicate their lives to saving others!
  READ MORE

Day 1 Rescue Challenge Snapshots

Wednesday, October 08, 2014

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Can I Use a Crane as Part of my Rescue Plan?

Thursday, October 02, 2014

One question that is often asked, "Can I use a crane as part of my rescue plan?"

With the exception of positioning the load attachment point of a crane for a high-point anchor, or using a properly rated “personnel basket” to move rescuers and victims, the answer is typically “no” – except in very rare and unique circumstances. The justification for using a crane to move personnel, even for the purposes of rescue, is very limited. Be sure you have a clear understanding of the guidelines and precautions.

Both OSHA General Industry and Construction Standards severely limit the use of cranes to move personnel, and prescribe the proper safety measures for these operations.   READ MORE

PJ’s Perform Rescue on the USS Alabama

Thursday, September 25, 2014

During a recent Roco Combat Technical Rescue course onboard the USS Alabama, an elite group of Pararescuemen were called to the “real thing” when a ship worker took a fall and needed to be rescued. According to Roco Tactical Chief Instructor Alex Reckendorf, the PJ’s performed a flawless rope rescue and integrated well with the Mobile Fire Department. He added, “As trainers, we are obviously very proud of their performance during this unexpected event. They represented both Pararescue and Roco well and are a credit to their career field.” 

Eight local pararescue airmen from Hurlburt Field were in the middle of a training session aboard the USS Alabama on Tuesday when they found themselves in the right place at the right time.  READ MORE

Retired and Dangerous...Mothballed Vessels and Abandoned Equipment

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

In a recent article in ASSE’s Professional Safety magazine, we found some very important points to consider for rescuers. Whether you are preparing for stand-by rescue operations, getting ready to enter an “abandoned in place” vessel, or just found the “perfect” retired vessel to use for your upcoming rescue training…proceed with caution!

The article does a great job of reminding us that not so long ago the emphasis on safety was far less than it is today. This becomes very clear when we compare current safety practices, such as Management of Change (MOC), and how the absence of that particular management tool has left many retired confined spaces and other systems in a potentially dangerous state.  READ MORE

Are You Sure You Don't Need On-Air Rescue Practice?

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Reported by Dennis O’Connell, Director of Training

After more than 25 years in the rescue industry, I always cringe a bit when I hear rescue teams say they don’t practice “on-air” rescues because personnel at their facilities are not allowed to do planned work activities in IDLH or low O2 areas. But I always ask, what about the permit spaces that may have the “potential” for atmospheric hazards? What about those spaces that may unexpectedly become IDLH or low O2 – what then?  

"I have raised this flag many times before and according to NIOSH, a little less than half the deaths from atmospheric conditions occurred in spaces that originally tested as being acceptable for entry. Something happened unexpectedly, and something went very wrong."  READ MORE

Roco QUICK DRILL #4 - Selecting the Proper Knot and Tying Correctly

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Being able to tie a knot in the classroom with a rope short vs. selecting the proper knot and tying it correctly in the field during an emergency requires experience. With a little imagination, you can provide your team members numerous scenarios to practice in just a short period of time while they are still within a controlled environment. This practice will help them to gain more experience that should pay off in the long run if needed during a real life emergency.

1.  Identify the knots your team uses, and where they are used in various systems.

2.  Lay out a series of applications where team members would need to tie a knot. Decide in advance what knots are acceptable in these applications since many times more than one knot may get the job done.   READ MORE


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