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OSHA Civil Penalties Set to Increase in August

Friday, July 08, 2016

OSHA’s maximum penalty for serious violations will increase from $7,000 to $12,471. The agency’s top penalty for willful or repeated violations will jump from $70,000 to $124,709. OSHA’s maximum penalties have not increased since 1990.

“Civil penalties should be a credible deterrent that influences behavior far and wide,” Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez said in a press release. “Adjusting our penalties to keep pace with the cost of living can lead to significant benefits for workers and can level the playing field [for] responsible employers who should not have to compete with those who don’t follow the law.”

OSHA's new penalty levels are scheduled to take effect after August 1, 2016. Any citations issued after this date will be subject to the new penalties if the related violations occurred after November 2, 2015. The interim final rules were announced June 30. Comments on the interim final rules will be due 45 days after the rules are published in the Federal Register. (Source: National Safety Council.)

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Roco's New RescueTalk™ Podcast

Wednesday, June 08, 2016

RescueTalk™ Podcasts explore critical topics for technical, industrial and municipal rescue professionals, emergency responders and safety personnel. Learn about confined space rescue, OSHA compliance, NFPA standards, fall protection, trench rescue, off-shore considerations, rescue equipment, training and more. Get it now.
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New from OSHA: Is 911 your Confined Space Rescue Plan?

Monday, May 16, 2016

OSHA has a new Fact Sheet for “Confined Spaces in Construction” that is designed to keep workers and emergency responders safe in permit-required confined spaces.

The new document from OSHA stresses that employers must select a service that has the ability to respond and conduct rescue in a timely manner based on site conditions and potential hazards specific to the space. It also states that “an employer who relies on local emergency services for assistance is required to meet the requirements of 1926.1211-Rescue and emergency services.”

This Fact Sheet includes information for emergency response providers along with key questions to consider before making a commitment to respond. It also emphasizes the importance of preplanning while encouraging service providers to work closely with employers in order to be properly prepared for the challenges they may face.

Click here to download OSHA Fact Sheet.

“Permit-required confined spaces can present conditions that are immediately dangerous to workers’ lives or health if not properly identified, evaluated, tested and controlled.”

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New CS Types Chart & Compliance Guide

Wednesday, May 04, 2016

This helpful new guide provides information for evaluating your rescue team or prospective rescue service based on the requirements of OSHA 1910.146 and 1926 Subpart AA. It includes a Rescue Team Evaluation Checklist from Appendix F and illustrates Confined Space Types 1-6, which is based on criteria from OSHA 1910.146. Roco’s method of categorizing confined spaces by various types can be useful in establishing practice requirements for your rescue service.

Responding in a safe, effective and timely manner to the various types of permit-required confined spaces at your facility is required by OSHA regulations 1910.146 (PRCS) and 1926 Subpart AA Confined Spaces in Construction.
An effective response by your rescue service is crucial to the safety of workers who are tasked with entering confined spaces to perform their job duties.

In order to be prepared, rescue teams can use this chart to plan their practice drills to include all of the various types of confined spaces. Appendix F of 1910.146 states that rescuers may practice in representative spaces that are considered “worst case” or most restrictive with respect to internal configuration, elevation and portal size. This illustrated guide will serve as a reminder to be prepared for the unexpected when planning for confined space emergencies for the safety of the rescuers and the entrants.

Register to Receive Your Free Confined Space Rescue Types Chart & Compliance Guide

Just give us your info, and Roco will mail you a copy.


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What is a Competent Person?

Wednesday, March 02, 2016

Many OSHA standards, especially in construction, require a “competent person” to be designated at the jobsite. Filling this role requires proper training, relevant experience to the work being performed and adequate knowledge of the associated regulations. 

The competent person should be able to recognize critical hazards as well as have the authority to take the action needed to mitigate hazards. It’s much more than just picking someone to fill a slot.

A previous article, "What is a Competent Person?" found in the National Safety Council's Safety+Health publication, talks about how the term is often taken too lightly. Again, it's much more than just selecting a body to fill a role or attending one 10-hour training class covering all the various standards. Competency must be considered and evaluated for this important role. 

At a minimum, your designated competent person should meet the following minimum qualifications:
(1)    A high level of understanding of the types of hazards typically encountered in that area of work;
(2)    A solid review of applicable standards relating to that type of work; and,
(3)    A thorough understanding of types of solutions to control or eliminate the hazards
.

To assist in preparing your competent person in fall protection, we encourage you to register for Roco's Fall Protection
Competent Person - April 4-5, 2016 course in Baton Rouge. This course will provide practical experience in recognizing fall hazards and developing appropriate measures for reducing or eliminating those hazards. 

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