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Inspection Process for Roco Training Ropes

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Question: We recently had a student ask how our training rope is monitored for wear and tear because of its extensive use...

Answer: Good question, and it’s a big job for us, no doubt. We’ve used and inspected a lot of rope in the past 35+ years, but this aspect of life safety can never be overlooked or taken lightly. As always, we urge everyone to carefully follow the care, use and inspection guidelines provided by their rope manufacturer. For added safety and as standard practice, we also use secondary back-up ropes and hardware in all field activities. 

Because we train thousands of students per year, we must accept the fact that there are numerous opportunities for our ropes to be exposed to wear such as being stepped on or exposed to dirt and gravel. It is for these reasons that we perform rigorous inspection of the ropes before and after use. Plus, we also conduct an annual competent person equipment inspection as recommended by NFPA.

As added safety, we also expect our students to do their part in monitoring the equipment during a class, and that’s why we’re glad you brought this up.
We teach and enforce rope care and inspection of all equipment, including ropes, in all of our classes. Inspections are accomplished at multiple times during any given class including during inventory. Additionally, all equipment is inspected by a Roco employee at the conclusion of each class. If there are any signs of damage or degradation that would render the rope unserviceable according to the manufacturer’s instructions for use, that rope will be taken out of service.

Of course, we’ve seen some rope damaged over the years, which is to be expected with the use our rope receives. However, to my knowledge, we’ve never had a rope failure. We’ve seen cut sheaths and sheath slippage, evidence of broken core fibers, and other damage that failed the rope inspection. But, not once, have we had a rope fail while it was being used to support a life load. The construction and the minimum breaking strength requirements of life safety rope provide a very substantial margin of safety. And, there again, we also have the redundancy of a back-up system in place.

All manufacturers of life safety rope are required by NFPA 1983 (2017 edition) to provide the following inspection criteria information in their instructions for use:

(1) Rope has not been visually damaged.
(2) Rope has not been exposed to heat, direct flame impingement, or abrasion.
(3) Rope has not been subjected to impact load.
(4) Rope has not been exposed to liquids, solids, gasses, mists, or vapors of any chemical or other material than can deteriorate rope.
(5) Rope passes inspection when inspected by a qualified person following the manufacturer’s inspection procedures both before and after each use.

The following inspection tips are provided by PMI Life Safety Rope:

HOW TO INSPECT YOUR ROPE

LOOK AT IT.... ALL OF IT!
Start at one end and look at every inch of the rope. Watch for signs that might indicate possible damage such as discoloration, chemical odors, abrasion, cuts or nicks in the outer sheath and visible differences in the diameter of the rope in one area in relation to the rest of the rope.

WRAP IT IN SMALL LOOPS AND LOOK!
Wrap the rope around your hand to form small loops at different random points along the ropes length. Look at these small loops as you make them, the consistency of the loop should be uniform throughout. If it’s not, you might have a problem with the rope’s core.

FEEL THE ROPE!
While you are looking at every inch of the rope, run it through your bare hands and feel it for changes that might indicate damage to the core. Changes may include any inconsistencies in rope diameter, soft or “mushy” spots, or extraordinarily stiff areas.

WRITE IT ALL DOWN!
Write the results of your inspection on the Rope Log included with your rope. Be sure to include anything you found in your inspection that might be or become a concern and document other important information about the rope such as an occurrence of uncontrolled or excessive loading, rope older than 10 years, contact with harmful chemicals, and history of use.

IF IN DOUBT, THROW IT OUT!
If you are not sure about the integrity of a rope........DON’T USE IT!
Consult the manufacturer if you need help.

So, thank you again for asking about the rope used continuously in our training programs. Even with our many years of experience, we do not take rope safety margins as a license to misuse our ropes. And that is why we are diligent in caring for and inspecting all of our equipment including the ropes. 






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