Roco Rescue

RescueTalk

WE DO RESCUE

NFPA Offering More Emergency Responder Guides for EVs

Friday, April 11, 2014

NFPA has posted more guides to prepare firefighters and other emergency responders for incidents involving electric vehicles (EVs). The guides are part of NFPA's Electric Vehicle Safety Training project, through which the association works with automobile manufacturers to inform the fire service and other first responders as the use of EVs increases.

These free first responder guides have been added to the website, according to a May 5 post by Mike Hazell:

  • 2014 Honda Accord HEV Emergency Response Guide
  • 2014 Honda Accord PHEV Emergency Response Guide
  • First Responder's Guide for the 2014 Infiniti Q70 Hybrid
  • First Responder's Guide for the 2014 Infiniti QX60 Hybrid
  • First Responder's Guide for the 2014 Nissan Pathfinder Hybrid
  • First Responder's Guide for the 2014 Nissan LEAF
  • First Responder's Guide for the 2015 Nissan LEAF
  •  

    http://ohsonline.com/articles/2014/05/06/nfpa-offering-more-emergency-responder-guides-for-evs.aspx

     
    read more 

    Q&A: Sked Stretcher - Is a Backboard Required?

    Wednesday, April 02, 2014

    READER QUESTION:
    Can a patient be lowered in a vertical or horizontal Sked without being lashed to a backboard or without a backboard at all?

    ROCO TECH PANEL RESPONSE:

    The answer is YES! This is one of the advantages of choosing the Sked stretcher.


    It can be used with most (if not all) backboards, with a short spine immobilizer, or with nothing at all.

    There are two general considerations in deciding what device to use with the Sked or other flexible litters:

    (1) Patient Condition - If spinal injuries or other injuries need the splinting effects or the protection of a backboard, then the victim should be lashed to a backboard. When a backboard is not in place, the Sked will help keep the body in line when tightened; however, the spine can continue to be manipulated up and down as patient is moved over objects or edges which can compromise the spine.

    If you are just using the backboard to keep the Sked rigid or protect the patient while placing them over edges, then technically you would not need to lash them to the backboard.

    When a confined space is too tight to use a backboard and possible spinal injuries are suspected, or additional protection for placing a patient over an edge is wanted, then a short spinal immobilizer such as the OSS can be used. If a spinal injury is not suspected, then no additional equipment needs to be used with the Sked. It is always good to keep in mind, however, that the thin plastic make-up of the Sked will allow the patient to feel every edge or bump you place or drag them over.


    (2) Location
    - What size portal do you need to get the patient and packaging through in order to perform the rescue? Many times in portals less than 18-inches, the individual pieces of equipment will fit into the space, but once put together they will not fit back out of the space. The Sked was designed for this specific circumstance. The thin plastic construction allows it to fit in places many other litters will not.

    The Sked can also be used vertically with the bottom not curled and secured in cases where a hare-traction splint or other injury doesn’t allow securement at the bottom.

    The Sked is a very user-friendly device that can be used in a multitude of configurations and for various applications. This is one of the reasons why it is such a popular rescue tool, especially for confined space rescue! Stay safe!


    NOTICE: The information provided on our website and by our Tech Panel is a complimentary service for our readers. Responses are based on our understanding of the reader’s inquiry, the equipment and/or the technique in question. All rescue systems should be evaluated by a competent person before use in the support of any human loads. Proper training is required prior to use of rescue techniques or systems discussed. Because standards and regulations are typically performance based and often dependent on specific circumstances, it is important to review all regulations in their entirety and to follow the proper protocols for your company or organization.

    read more 

    NFL Quarterback Honors Boston Firefighters

    Monday, March 24, 2014

     
    This time, it was Tom Brady watching from the sidelines, as Boston firefighters battled the nine-alarm blaze near his home. From the back deck of his home, which was four doors down from the fire, Brady told how he watched the incident unfold. “I had a firsthand view of all the action and was blown away by all the bravery and the teamwork that they really displayed,” Brady told a local radio station.

     “I mean, we athletes think that we’re heroes, but when you witness it first hand, you realize who the real heroes are in this world and that’s the people that work hard to protect our lives and protect our safety and our freedoms as Americans. That’s certainly the Boston firefighters and the police and the state troopers. I just want to say thank you from the bottom of my heart.” Brady added. 

    We, at Roco, couldn’t agree more! We also offer our condolences to the Boston Fire Department and the many families affected by this tragedy.

    Source: NFLevolution.com, Bill Bradley, contributing editor 

    read more 

    Potential Safety Issues Regarding Petzl CROLL

    Friday, March 21, 2014

    6-10-14 Update on Petzl CROLL Potential Safety Issues

    After Petzl met with their distributors regarding the Petzl CROLL (B16 & B16AAA) issue, they have provided us with the following statements:

     • Estimated devices that would potentially be exposed to this event is less than 1 in 100,000 devices produced.

    • The exposure was only documented in three known devices which were all the old style CROLL (Petzl has redesigned the CROLL and no longer produces the previous generation).

    • Petzl has determined that the specific deficiency in devices could only come from either corrosion due to exposure to grain silo work, or from over use of the device (in the primary case it was determined that the device should have been retired at least a year prior to incident).

    • After months of testing in various conditions and states of use, Petzl has not been able to replicate the condition documented with these devices in question.

    Petzl has redesigned the CROLL to have a stainless steel cam as well as stainless steel reinforcement in the rope channel which attaches to the riveted portion of the device to ensure that there will be no replication of the events that occurred to the three older generation devices. Petzl also has no warranted reason to issue a recall of this device at present or in the near future.

    Previous Post:

    Roco Rescue has recently learned there are potential safety issues regarding the Petzl Croll (B16 & B16AAA). According to Petzl, two different customers have informed them of the failure of the rivet head on two Petzl Croll rope clamps. Although neither of these failures have led to an accident, the Petzl technical team is urgently reviewing this issue with in-depth investigations to understand what exactly caused these failures.

    Petzl wants to remind consumers that "when connected to a rope device, the user must have a back-up device or a connection to a second rope clamp as a secondary means of support." They also encourage that users thoroughly inspect their CROLL B16 & B16AAA to ensure that the rivet head is not missing. The results of this investigation will be released no later than April 18th.

     NOTE: This notice does not affect similar products such as the CROLL B16BAA, ASCENSION or PANTIN. With the facts known today it currently only affects the old CROLL B16 and B16AAA that were produced in 2012.

    Stay connected to Roco Rescue for your latest news on this issue.

    http://www.petzl.com/us/pro/safety-information-croll-B16AAA-us  

     

    read more 

    Q&A: Strength Impact on Webbing

    Tuesday, March 11, 2014

    READER QUESTION:
    Regarding the Roco video/technique for shortening webbing... what is the strength impact on the webbing with this technique? When going from the looping double/basket method to a choker configuration changes the strength quite a bit because of all sorts of twists and bends... would the strength impact be 50%?

    ROCO TECH PANEL RESPONSE:
    After reviewing your question, we decided to do some “in-house” testing. Of course, it’s unofficial, but here’s what we did and the results are shown below.

    Using new 1-inch tubular webbing anchored to a fixed anchor 2 inches in diameter, a “webbing shortening technique” knot was placed in the webbing. The webbing was marked with a felt tip marker on both sides of the knot to measure slippage. A carabiner was placed in the test webbing and attached to the dynamometer by a short piece of 1-inch tubular webbing that was looped, doubled and ran through the attachment opening on the dynamometer. The dynamometer was then anchored to the load.

    Unofficial In-House Test Results:

    1. Unloaded 20-ft of 1-ft piece of tubular webbing:
      Force applied 3,340 lbf with 2½ inches of slippage in the webbing.

    2. Loaded 30-ft webbing of 1-ft piece of tubular webbing:
      Force applied 3,560 lbf with ¾ inch slippage.

    3. Loaded 30-ft webbing of 1-ft piece of tubular webbing:
      Force applied 5,080 lbf with 1 inch slippage.

    4. Loaded 30-ft webbing of 1-ft piece of tubular webbing:
      Force applied 5,460 lbf with 1 inch slippage.

    5. Loaded 40-ft webbing of 1-ft piece of tubular webbing:
      Force applied 5,620 lbf with ¾ inch slippage.

    6. Loaded 40-ft webbing of 1-ft piece of tubular webbing:
      Force applied 6,230 lbf with 1 inch slippage.


    Tests #1 & #2 were slow tension pulls on the knot. Tests #3 & #6 were dynamic shock loading. Tests #5 & #6 both had failures of the 1-inch tubular webbing anchor at the attachment to the dynamometer. The failed anchor webbing was in a basket looped and doubled configuration and failed at the sharp angle connection on the device.
    The test webbing did not fail in any of the tests, but on tests #5 & #6 it showed slight glazing on the inside of the knot when inspected.

    Due to the failure of the anchor webbings, we were not able to generate more than the 6,230 lbf force on the system. Based on these unofficial tests, I would feel comfortable using the technique for NFPA General Use loads and would not expect it to weaken the webbing any more than the efficiency loss of any other knot that would be tied into the webbing, including a water knot.



    NOTICE: The information provided on our website and by our Tech Panel is a complimentary service for our readers. Responses are based on our understanding of the reader’s inquiry, the equipment and/or the technique in question. All rescue systems should be evaluated by a competent person before use in the support of any human loads. Proper training is required prior to use of rescue techniques or systems discussed. Because standards and regulations are typically performance based and often dependent on specific circumstances, it is important to review all regulations in their entirety and to follow the proper protocols for your company or organization.

    read more 

    Previous Next
    1 .. 26 27 28 29 30 .. 61

    RescueTalk (RocoRescue.com) has been created as a free resource for sharing insightful information, news, views and commentary for our students and others who are interested in technical rope rescue. Therefore, we make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, or suitability of any information and are not liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis. Users and readers are 100% responsible for their own actions in every situation. Information presented on this website in no way replaces proper training!